Novel methods for the prevention of infection in intravascular catheters

by Judith Margaret Holford

Publisher: University of Birmingham in Birmingham

Written in English
Published: Downloads: 244
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Edition Notes

Thesis (M.Sc.) - University of Birmingham, Dept. of Clinical Microbiology, 1992.

Statementby Judith Margaret Holford.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20860416M

O’Grady N, Alexander M, Burns L, et al., and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee. Guidelines for the Prevention of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections, [Internet]. [cited Feb 28]. related bloodstream infection (BSI). Methods: Arterial catheters in two randomized trials in e were studied prospec-tively. One trial studied the effect of a 1% chlorhexidine e75% alcohol solution for cutaneous antisepsis for intravascular catheters, and the other trial studied the efficacy of a. There were 30 catheter days with CHGIS dressings and 31 catheter days with SDs. There was a statistically significant decrease in the rate of CLABSI per catheter days in the SD group, from to (P), with an absolute risk reduction of There was a significantly lower incidence in the rate of CLABSI per   This study was undertaken to assess whether the non-coated surface treatment of a unique catheter material (ChronoFlex C® with BioGUARD™) could inhibit bacterial attachment and biofilm s: A novel in vitro model and fluorescence microscopy were used to compare two intravascular catheter materials with respect to bacterial.

Fletcher. Catheter-related bloodstream infection Contin Educ Anaesth Crit Care Pain () 5 (2): Ibid. Zhang L, et al. Microbial biofilms associated with intravascular catheter-related bloodstream infections in adult intensive care patients. Eur J . Get this from a library! Catheter-Related Infections in the Critically Ill. [Naomi P O'Grady; Didier Pittet] -- Catheter-Related Infections in the Critically Ill provides an overview from an international perspective on intravascular catheters and the risk of infection. This volume highlights: Epidemiology. O'Grady NP, Gerberding JL, Weinstein RA, Masur H. Patient safety and the science of prevention: the time for implementing the Guidelines for the prevention of intravascular catheter-related infections is now. Crit Care Med ; Mermel LA. Prevention of intravascular catheter-related infections. Ann Intern Med ; Catheter tips were cultured and venography was repeated at catheter removal. RESULTS: Mean duration of catheter placement was 92 days. Infection occurred in 11 patients (five in the treatment group, six in the control group). Tip cultures in 15 patients (eight treatment, seven control) were positive without clinical infection.

Central venous catheters, often needed by cancer patients, can be the source of Nocardia bacteremia. We evaluated the clinical characteristics and outcomes of 17 cancer patients with Nocardia bacteremia. For 10 patients, the bacteremia was associated with the catheter; for the other 7, it was a disseminated infection. N. nova complex was the leading cause of bacteremia. Intravascular Catheter - described in the FDA regulation. 21 CFR as "a device CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ODE Blue Book Memorandum #K 5 10(k) Sterility. The midline catheter may be inserted by specially trained registered nurses with PIV insertion experience. Large numbers of RNs trained in anatomy and physiology, aseptic technique, and monitoring methods for identification of complications, would vastly increase the capability of an institution to provide safer intravascular practice.

Novel methods for the prevention of infection in intravascular catheters by Judith Margaret Holford Download PDF EPUB FB2

Maki DG, Mermel LA, Klugar D, Narans L, Knasinski V, Parenteau S, Covington P. The efficacy of a chlorhexidine impregnated sponge (Biopatch) for the prevention of intravascular catheter-related infection-a prospective randomized controlled multicenter study.

In: ICAAC. Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Google ScholarAuthor: Naomi P. O’Grady. Intravascular catheter-related infections: advances in diagnosis, prevention, and management novel approaches, methods, and technologies for the control of CRBSIs.

apparent source for the bloodstream infection except the catheter. In addition to the. Purpose: To review the literature on prevention of intravascular catheter-related infections.

Data sources: The MEDLINE database, conference proceedings, and bibliographies of review articles and book chapters were searched for relevant articles. Primary authors were contacted directly if data were incomplete.

Study selection: Studies met the following criteria unless otherwise stated: Trials Cited by: PURPOSE To review the literature on prevention of intravascular catheter-related infections. DATA SOURCES The MEDLINE database, conference proceedings, and bibliographies of review articles and book chapters were searched for relevant articles.

Primary authors were contacted directly if data were incomplete. STUDY SELECTION Studies met the following criteria unless otherwise stated: Trials.

This timely guide details, in a highly accessible manner, the pathogenesis, epidemiology, and major complications of catheter-related infections (CRIs) as well as the types of catheters and etiological agents involved-providing practical approaches to the diagnosis, management, and prevention of CRIs.

GUIDELINES Guidelines for the Prevention of Intravascular Catheter-related Infections NaomiP.O'Grady,1 MaryAlexander,2 ,3 nDellinger,4 JeffreyGarland,5 ,6 Pamela A. Lipsett,7 Henry Masur,1 Leonard A. Mermel,8 Michele L. Pearson,9 Issam I. Raad,10 Adrienne G. Randolph,11 Mark E.

Rupp,12 Sanjay Saint,13 and the Healthcare Infection. Intravascular catheters play an important role in infections in intensive care and hemodialysis patients.

This becomes evident only if full microbiological diagnoses are made. Difficulties in the diagnosis and treatment of microbially colonized catheters make the prevention of infection particularly important. The most important preventive measures are a strict evaluation of the indications.

However, as current clinical guidelines for intravascular catheter-related infection management from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) are still ambiguous on the treatment strategy. Background: Although many catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) are preventable, measures to reduce these infections are not uniformly implemented.

Objective: To update an existing evidenced-based guideline that promotes strategies Novel methods for the prevention of infection in intravascular catheters book prevent CR-BSIs.

Data sources: The MEDLINE database, conference proceedings, and bibliographies of review articles and book chapters were. Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and is intended to replace the Guideline for Prevention of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections published in The goal was to test the performance of the novel catheter in vivo for reduction of thrombophlebitis.

Methods. Very short peripheral catheter prototypes were inserted into swine ear veins (n = 12). Verification of the catheter conformation in situ and blood perfusion was performed using Echo‐Doppler.

The SPCT development rate was measured. Methods. This quality improvement project was conducted at a Intensive care units (ICUs) within a - bed- level 1 trauma teaching facility.

On Augusta novel comprehensive tool to reduce CAUTIs, was created by a multi-disciplinary team with a focus on minimizing catheter utilization and order of urine cultures. INTRODUCTION. The use of intravascular catheters for vascular access and haemodynamic monitoring has become a central part of modern medicine [].Infections with significant morbidity and mortality are the predominant complications associated with the use of these devices [1,2].Intravenous catheters are the commonest cause of hospital-acquired bloodstream infections [].

Infection. ;27 Suppl 1:S Prevention of infections caused by central venous catheters--established and novel measures. Bach A(1). Author information: (1)Klinik für Anästhesiologie, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Germany.

Intravascular catheters play an important role in infections in intensive care and hemodialysis patients. Background Central venous catheters have become essential devices for the management of critically and chronically ill patients; however, their use is often complicated by catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs), many of which could be prevented.

Methods This report is based on a literature review of more than published articles in intravascular catheter-related infections.

PURPOSE: To review the literature on prevention of intravascular catheter-related infections. DATA SOURCES: The MEDLINE database, conference proceedings, and bibliographies of review articles and book chapters were searched for relevant articles.

Primary authors were contacted directly if. Synthesis: The recommended preventive strategies with the strongest supportive evidence are education and training of healthcare providers who insert and maintain catheters; maximal sterile barrier precautions during central venous catheter insertion; use of a 2% chlorhexidine preparation for skin antisepsis; no routine replacement of central venous catheters for prevention of infection.

Mermel LA. Prevention of intravascular catheter-related infections. Ann Intern Med. Mar 7; (5)– Maki DG, Stolz SM, Wheeler S, Mermel LA. Prevention of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infection by use of an antiseptic-impregnated catheter.

A randomized, controlled trial. Ann Intern Med. Aug 15; (4)– To determine 1) the efficacy of a novel antiseptic catheter in preventing central venous catheter-related infection, 2) patient tolerance of this catheter, and 3) the sources of bloodstream.

METHODS English-language reports of prospective studies of adults published between January 1,and July 1,were identified by MEDLINE search using the following general search strategy: bacteremla [Medical Subject Heading, MeSH]OR septicemia [MeSH]OR bloodstream Infection AND the specific type of intravascular device (e.g., central.

Guidelines for the prevention of intravascular catheter-related infections. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. DATA SOURCES: The MEDLINE database, conference proceedings, and bibliographies of review articles and book chapters were searched for relevant articles.

no routine replacement of central venous catheters for prevention of infection. More thanintravascular device-related bloodstream infections (BSIs) occur in the United States each year, the majority caused by central venous catheters (CVCs) [].CVC-related BSIs are associated with prolongation of hospital stay and added costs to the health care system of $33,–$65, per case [2, 3].Microorganisms cause CVC-related infection when they gain.

The prevention of infection in the health care setting remains a key goal for all health care personnel. All health care establishments also have a need to continually improve the quality of care they provide and ensure a safe working environment.

Health care-associated infections lengthen patients' hospital stays and increase both morbidity and mortality. present methods of prevention and treatment of such infections.

Defi ning catheter-related infection Catheter-related infections include localised entrance-site and management of intravascular catheter-related infection,16 particularly in the setting of severe sepsis and. Intravascular catheter-related bloodstream infections are an important cause of illness and excess medical cost.

In prospective studies, the relative risk (RR) for a catheter-related bloodstream infection is 2 to times higher with central venous catheters than peripheral venous catheters (1–3).Approximat catheter-related bloodstream infections occur in U.S.

intensive-care units. the prevention of intravascular catheter-related infection – a prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter trial [abstract ].

Abstracts and Proceedings of the 40th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy. Washington, DC.

catheter tract and cause infection A novel CHG-impregnated hydrophilic vascular Statistical Methods The regrowthstudy on prepped subclaviansites was designed to detect a log difference () in bacterial counts for the prevention of intravascular catheter-related infection—a prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter trial.

catheter site along the subcutaneous tract of a tunneled (eg, Hickman, Broviac) catheter, in the absence of concomitant BSI Pocket Infection Purulent fluid in the subcutaneous pocket of a totally im-planted intravascular catheter that might or might not be as-sociated with spontaneous rupture and drainage or.

A majority of bloodstream infections seen in intensive care units stem from intravascular catheters used on patients.

Catheter hubs are the entrance for pathogenic microorganisms into the inner surfaces of the catheters. The pathogenic microorganisms colonization in the mentioned areas can cause central line-associated bloodstream infection. Background. Intravascular catheters are indispensable in modern-day medical practice, particularly in intensive care units (ICUs).

Although such catheters provide necessary vascular access, their use puts patients at risk for local and systemic infectious complications, including local site infection, CRBSI, septic thrombophlebitis, endocarditis, and other metastatic infections (eg, lung.

"These guidelines have been developed for healthcare personnel who insert intravascular catheters and for persons responsible for surveillance and control of infections in hospital, outpatient, and home healthcare settings.

and is intended to replace the Guideline for Prevention of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections published in   Tetrasodium EDTA as a Novel Central Venous Catheter Lock Solution Against Biofilm - Volume 26 Issue 6 - Steven L.

Percival, Peter Kite, Kerrie Eastwood, Ricardo Murga, Janice Carr, Matthew J. Arduino, Rodney M. Donlan.Methods for the diagnosis of acute fever for a patient suspected of having short-term central venous catheter infection or arterial catheter infection.

CFU, colony-forming units. the catheter hub culture strongly suggests that the catheter is not the source of a bloodstream infection (A-II). If a venous access subcutaneous port is removed for.